World's Best Boss

Leadership Roundup

Leading worship isn’t just about music. It’s also about leading people: the people on your team and the people in your congregation.

There are so many great articles on leadership being posted online, and I’m finding new ones every week. So that means it’s time for this week’s Leadership Roundup.

Below you’ll find some of the best leadership resources I came across this week. Save them to Instapaper or Pocket or Read It Later or your bookmarks, and check them out when you have some time this weekend. Be challenged and be encouraged. Be a better leader.

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Carey Nieuwhof shares three things that leaders should stop saying:

Often, you and I say certain phrases without thinking because, well, everyone says them. Yet saying the wrong words or phrases repeatedly set up a self-defeating pattern simply by being part of our vocabulary… Unless I remind myself to stop saying these 3 phrases, I say them every day. And they never help me lead well. In fact, they do the opposite. So what are they?

Dan Rockwell lists twelve ways that leaders can empower their team members:

Lousy leaders feel powerful by making others feel powerless. You can’t grasp power and give it at the same time. Leaders who fear losing power are afraid to make others feel powerful… 12 powerful ways to make others feel powerful…

Jason Castellente reminds us how important it is for leaders to set and share goals:

It’s easy for experienced technical directors and production techs to glaze over the small steps or get frustrated when less experienced people don’t do exactly what we want. If we haven’t clearly defined what we want, we are doing them a disservice and we’ve failed as a leader in what we’re doing.

Daniel Darling lists five leadership mistakes that lead to failure:

What struck us was how these things evolve from little, seemingly insignificant decisions that form the culture out of which unhealthy leadership grows. In other words, nobody wakes up one day and says to himself, “I’m going to strive to be an authoritarian leader who wreaks havoc on the people I serve.” It just doesn’t happen that way. Leaders start with good intentions. They start as “normal” people. So how do leaders fail? I think there are five basic mistakes leaders make:

Steve Caton shares three leadership lessons from Sunday School class:

Do you remember Sunday School? Graham crackers and goldfish, flannel boards and puppet shows, Bible songs and Christmas plays — most of us who grew up in the church (or are raising our own children in it) have some nostalgic memories of childhood Sunday mornings. You probably remember some of the lessons, too. You were learning good Biblical principles and life lessons in those classes. What you might not have realized is that you were also learning vital leadership principles.

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