Leadership Roundup

Leading worship isn’t just about music. It’s also about leading people: the people on your team and the people in your congregation.

There are so many great articles on leadership being posted online, and I’m finding new ones every week. So that means it’s time for this week’s Leadership Roundup.

Below you’ll find some of the best leadership resources I came across this week. Save them to Instapaper or Pocket or Read It Later or your bookmarks, and check them out when you have some time this weekend. Be challenged and be encouraged. Be a better leader.

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Kelly Sundsvold on the dangers of lukewarm leadership:

When “status quo” becomes the new hipster trend…

When singing “set a fire down in my soul” barely brings the water to a weak simmer…

When the Sunday worship time becomes more like a robotic Christian top 10 countdown….

…there may be a need for a prayerful revival, revamp, and refocus on what God’s will is for the music ministry.

The team will only rise to the level of the leader. If the leader is lukewarm, and mentally checked out, it travels through the whole team. This can produce a dangerous side effect…

Laura Copeland teaches you five questions church leaders should use for self-examination and burnout prevention:

As the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. I’ve found a regular practice of personal examination and reflection on what God is up to in my life is essential to staying healthy in ministry. Whether it’s helping me stay closely connected to Jesus during the good times (and away from coasting or relying on myself), or helping me catch the early signs of burnout during the not-so-good times. Here are the questions I regularly ask myself…

Matt Adair shares four common qualities in great leaders:

What do great leaders have in common?

As you lead – or help other people grow as leaders – keep these four things in mind.

Lolly Daskal lists nine keys to effective servant leadership:

Richard is and will always be a servant leader, a man who leads from within. The people who interact with him every day can vouch for that.

But he is also human.

Sometimes he cannot be there the way he wants to be. That fact of life was causing him to feel less successful as a servant leader, when in truth he is the best kind: an imperfect person with a perfect giving heart.

With the right attitudes and actions, the rest of us imperfect humans can also be effective servant leaders.

Here’s how…

Aubrey McGowan explains three things that can’t be allowed to grow within your team:

You need the trust of your team. With it you can pour a maximum amount of energy and resources into your most critical mission. Without it you waste precious finite resources chasing dysfunction and disunity.

Leaders of dynamic organizations don’t have extra resources to waste.

If you are serious about cultivating a culture of trust, you are likely already pouring a lot of resources into your people. It would be a shame to invest your best into a harvest only to let weeds come up and choke it before it’s ripe. Here are three poisonous weeds guaranteed to destroy your culture of trust.

Leadership Roundup

Leading worship isn’t just about music. It’s also about leading people: the people on your team and the people in your congregation.

There are so many great articles on leadership being posted online, and I’m finding new ones every week. So that means it’s time for this week’s Leadership Roundup.

Below you’ll find some of the best leadership resources I came across this week. Save them to Instapaper or Pocket or Read It Later or your bookmarks, and check them out when you have some time this weekend. Be challenged and be encouraged. Be a better leader.

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Thom Rainer lists ten things that really bother many church leaders:

You won’t hear pastors express these frustrations often, but they are very real.

Indeed, some of these issues hinder their ministries. Here are ten of the most common frustrations, followed by close approximations of quotes I’ve heard from pastors.

Kendall Conner teaches you how to keep your volunteer team happy and on-task:

For many leading in creative ministry, whether it be in production or communication, you’re often a volunteer or part-time employee yourself. You’re having to balance the demand of following your leaders while also leading your team to fulfill their expectations. And if you’re like I was a few years back, you may not have any experience leading people at all.

So, how do you keep those who are serving under you excited to show up on Sundays? How do you keep their passion to work hard to accomplish tasks alive?

Ron Edmondson shares four pieces of wisdom for new leaders:

It has just been a few years ago I was a “newbie” myself. I speak with more passion, and perhaps even more authority on the subject, because I learned along the way. I Tweeted him back and said “Learn the people first – go slow to change – think intentional in all you do – pace yourself.”

And, that was enough for Twitter. This is my blog, however, so I assume I should explain a little further.

Here are 4 pieces of advice for the new leader…

Joe Hoagland explains why church leaders need to be in fellowship with leaders from other churches:

This is a natural inclination for most of us. We believe in the church we lead, the mission, the exact theology, and everything else about it. We want to see people meet Jesus and grow in our doors.

But we need to grow past this. We need to grow past our fear or jealously of other churches and fellowship with area pastors. No, I am not talking about fellowshipping with pastors hours away or your friends from seminary, (great things to do by the way) but pastors of churches in your town, city, or community.

So here are some concrete reasons why you need to fellowship with area pastors…

From Harvard Business Review, a leadership lesson that most of us know deep down, but tend to ignore anyway:

In our hyper-connected, 24/7 world, many of us are losing sleep — literally. Our own survey of more than 180 business leaders found that four out of 10 (43%) say they do not get enough sleep at least four nights a week. Such sleep deficiencies can undermine important forms of leadership behavior and eventually hurt financial performance. This article will explore the link between sleep and leadership before discussing solutions that can improve both individual well-being and organizational efficiency and effectiveness.

Leadership Roundup

Leading worship isn’t just about music. It’s also about leading people: the people on your team and the people in your congregation.

There are so many great articles on leadership being posted online, and I’m finding new ones every week. So that means it’s time for this week’s Leadership Roundup.

Below you’ll find some of the best leadership resources I came across this week. Save them to Instapaper or Pocket or Read It Later or your bookmarks, and check them out when you have some time this weekend. Be challenged and be encouraged. Be a better leader.

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Charles Stone lists some things leaders should look for in a confidant:

In a previous blog post I wrote about how many pastors suffer with relational anorexia. Pastors can find a cure for this devastating issue when we seek out and find people with whom we can process the pain ministry inevitably brings. As you consider the traits you’d look for in a safe person, consider these Scriptures and the guidelines they infer, because these people are often difficult to spot.

Steve Keating on the importance of earning trust as a leader:

Congratulations on having a big shot sounding title or a lofty position at some company. I’m going to give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you’ve worked hard to earn your position and I’m also going to give you some advice: don’t screw it up.

Don’t screw it up by assuming that any title or position can make you a leader. Positions don’t make someone a leader and neither does a title. Saying you’re a leader doesn’t make you a leader either.

In fact there is only one thing that can truly make you a leader…

Justin Trapp explains how to transform good volunteers into strong leaders:

It happens all the time…You have a member of your church who is an awesome volunteer so you ask them to be a leader of a ministry, and they struggle…

They were a phenomenal volunteer but not a great leader…

Allstar “do-ers” don’t make great leaders.

They are uniquely different roles we should be aware of when promoting or hiring people on your team.

Here are 3 keys to helping your great producers turn into great leaders…

Duke DeJong teaches you how to build volunteer team without being a recruiter:

Truth be told, being needy can be more of a turnoff for artists, as a fear of being “sucked in” or becoming over-committed can set in at the thought of being needed. But as I dig into this shift we needed to make, I realized nearly all artists want four things. They want to be connected to a community, feel like their art makes a difference, know what the greater mission is, and have a clear role in achieving it. These four concepts literally changed how I did ministry, and how I began building successful teams.

Brandon Cox lists some important ways to invest in the people you lead:

And the second obstacle is that I don’t think we’ve clearly defined what it is we need to be pouring into the leaders we’re developing. Does that mean having coffee and chatting about life? Does it mean walking through a training course or workbook? I think the answer lies somewhere in between those two options.

There are at least eight gifts I hope to pour into the people I’m leading, and I hope they pass these gifts along to others too.

Leadership Roundup

Leading worship isn’t just about music. It’s also about leading people: the people on your team and the people in your congregation.

There are so many great articles on leadership being posted online, and I’m finding new ones every week. So that means it’s time for this week’s Leadership Roundup.

Below you’ll find some of the best leadership resources I came across this week. Save them to Instapaper or Pocket or Read It Later or your bookmarks, and check them out when you have some time this weekend. Be challenged and be encouraged. Be a better leader.

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Perry Noble shares seven essential characteristics of church leaders:

As I have been thinking through my personal leadership journey lately and trying to figure out who God has called me to be and what He’s called me to do…I have narrowed my focus down to seven areas that I believe are essential for effective leadership in the church.

Dan Reiland explains how climbing a thousand foot waterfall taught him some leadership lessons:

We were in Ocho Rios, Jamaica and signed up for the 1,000 ft. waterfall climb (Dunn’s River Falls), set in the beautiful and natural Jamaican countryside.

The falls were huge with fast moving water over large boulders. But the naturally-terraced waterfall terrain created pools of water that made the climb relatively easy. Well, mostly easy. There were a few scraped ankles and bruised toes, but we all made it up in good shape!

The Jamaican guide instructed us…

Church leaders should take to heart Thom Rainer’s list of reasons that members burn out:

Burnout among church members may not be as obvious and dramatic as this example, but it is real. Some members gradually become less and less involved until you don’t see them anymore.

Such are some of the symptoms of church member burnout. But what are the causes? Here are five common causes.

Mac Lake lists four ways to tell if a church leader is living out his or her core values:

A wise leader of any organization will spend significant time thinking through and carefully crafting organizational values. He understands as the team lives out these prescribed behaviors the organization is more likely to accomplish its mission. While listing Core Values is a common practice, unfortunately living out core values is not. In many cases organizational values are posted on a wall and forgotten or ignored. In other cases the values are defined but no one is sure how they integrate into the daily life of the organization. As a result the values lack the power and influence they’re intended to have. So how do know if your values are adding value?

Dan Black shares three ways to lead yourself well:

A leader has several key roles. Some of the most essential include: leading and managing people, casting vision, training and equipping, uniting a team together, delivering results, creating change, and cultivating a positive working environment. There is one quality you need to have if you want to be successful in those roles. The quality is to be able to lead yourself. Leading yourself is about leading and managing your actions, attitude, and behavior. Thomas J. Watson, the former chairman of IBM, said, “Nothing so conclusively proves a man’s ability to lead others as what he does from day to day to lead himself.” Your effectiveness or lack of effectiveness as a leader always starts with you. Leading yourself is a challenging task because the hardest person you will ever lead is you. To help you lead yourself well I offer you these 3 self-leadership principles

Leadership Roundup

Leading worship isn’t just about music. It’s also about leading people: the people on your team and the people in your congregation.

There are so many great articles on leadership being posted online, and I’m finding new ones every week. So that means it’s time for this week’s Leadership Roundup.

Below you’ll find some of the best leadership resources I came across this week. Save them to Instapaper or Pocket or Read It Later or your bookmarks, and check them out when you have some time this weekend. Be challenged and be encouraged. Be a better leader.

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

David Staal lists eight things that good leaders owe their teams:

Eventually, you learn your way through enough situations, and you begin to feel more comfortable in the role. At least for a moment. And in that moment, you give thanks: for the people you lead, of course, and also for the grace they’ve shown… Don’t leave that moment quite yet. Instead, take the next step in leading well by first recognizing that your position exists because a team exists. And you owe them. Specifically, you owe them eight commitments…

Chris Surratt explains five ways to help prevent burnout in church leaders:

When your structure is built solely on the perseverance of the leaders, it will eventually stop growing. There is only so much that a leader, especially a volunteer leader, can produce before something has to give.

Here are five things that you can build into your structure that will allow your leaders to continue to grow without burning out…

Joseph Lalonde teaches how to fight against the “blah” seasons in leadership:

There are many situations which could be called the leadership blahs. For me, it was the nights I didn’t want to get my stuff together and be there for the students. I wanted to be selfish and do my own thing.

I also had times where I was frustrated because I didn’t think the students were progressing fast enough. They seemed like they were stuck in their old ways and didn’t want to change.

Your leadership blahs may look different. You may be worn out from a large project launch. Your blah time in leadership may come from team members who never listen.

David Good lists five practices that separate good leaders from great leaders:

What separates good leaders from exceptional leaders? If you were to poll 100 random people, I am sure you would get a wide variety of answers to that based on personal experience. The [5] things I am going to share with you are based on my own experience. You may not agree with all of them and might even have others to add to this list. These [5] things are the leadership qualities I have found that take leaders from good to exceptional.

Chris Creech shows why church leadership can be a lot like parenting little ones:

Sometimes kids can be tricky. Sometimes, the church can be tricky. If you’re a church leader and a parent, you can definitely relate to what parenting can teach you about leading in the church.

Leadership Roundup

Leading worship isn’t just about music. It’s also about leading people: the people on your team and the people in your congregation.

There are so many great articles on leadership being posted online, and I’m finding new ones every week. So that means it’s time for this week’s Leadership Roundup.

Below you’ll find some of the best leadership resources I came across this week. Save them to Instapaper or Pocket or Read It Later or your bookmarks, and check them out when you have some time this weekend. Be challenged and be encouraged. Be a better leader.

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Joshua Reich on seasons, leadership, cycles, and farming:

I grew up in a farming community, so everyone was very aware of the seasons and what those seasons meant for life. Certain things happened during certain times of the year. You planted, watered, prepped the dirt and harvested plants at certain times. If you did it at the wrong time (too early or too late), you could harm the crops and miss what could be.

Life, leadership and church are the same. There are times when things are high (harvesting the crops) and times when you are prepping the dirt (getting ready) or pulling out weeds, and it feels like nothing is happening.

Then, like a farm, you start over…

Brian Charette lists three mistakes that church leaders seem to keep making:

With all that we know about what effective leadership is, what are we still doing that hurts our efforts? So, I’ve been spending my research time with a particular focus on poor leadership practices that are still very common, despite the treasure of knowledge on effective practices. This is the other side of the “Five Exemplary Leadership Practices” I wrote about in a series.

There are three things church lay leaders, pastors, ministers, Sunday School teachers and small group leaders commonly still fail to do despite knowing better…

Steve Caton shares three benefits we see when church leaders are different, and maybe a little bit crazy:

Unfortunately, being different isn’t something that is universally embraced, even in the local church, where we have a calling to be different. Too often, churches do everything possible, from programming to mission statements to hairstyles, to imitate other churches we perceive as successful. In the process, we eliminate everything that makes our church truly unique.

Why be different?

I believe the Church needs more leaders who, like Steve Jobs, aren’t afraid of being different. This isn’t just because being different is cool. There are actually some powerful benefits as well…

Lolly Daskal lists ten lies that leaders tell themselves:

We all try to think well of ourselves, but there are lies we can tell ourselves that do harm to ourselves. Maybe we fear being vulnerable, but we end up insulating ourselves from truths we need, and the cost is high. Do you recognize yourself in any of these untruths? If so, it may be time to have a heart-to-heart talk with yourself…

Charles Stone on caffeine and leadership:

I’m a leader. I want to maximize my brain power. And I care about how I treat my body. I don’t drink coffee or tea, yet I do strategically use caffeine with diet caffeine drinks and 5-Hour Energy (Disclaimer: I am in no way related to the company who produces 5-Hour Energy). I believe my strategic use of caffeine has helped enhance my cognitive resources as a leader. In this post I look at three areas: what caffeine does to your brain, cautions about its use, and how to strategically use it.

Leadership Roundup

Leading worship isn’t just about music. It’s also about leading people: the people on your team and the people in your congregation.

There are so many great articles on leadership being posted online, and I’m finding new ones every week. So that means it’s time for this week’s Leadership Roundup.

Below you’ll find some of the best leadership resources I came across this week. Save them to Instapaper or Pocket or Read It Later or your bookmarks, and check them out when you have some time this weekend. Be challenged and be encouraged. Be a better leader.

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Joe Hoagland shares six steps to take when leadership gets difficult:

Let’s face it we have all been there: the thoughts of doubt, writing out the resignation letter, wondering why it seems everyone is against you. We think shouldn’t leading God’s church be easy? But instead you get opposition to every change, every new idea, even personally with every personality quirk… Here’s what you can do when leading in the Church gets tough…

Brent Mann reminds us why mentoring is such an essential aspect of leadership:

A little confused I asked, “What’s the new season?” I heard one word deep inside my heart. “Mentorship.” With that one word, the scales fell of my eyes, and I could see that I needed to become less of the doer and more of a leader in our department. I was spending all of my time doing, and never growing a team (probably because I was worried that people would mess things up).

So what does it mean to be a leader/mentor?

Brandon Cox lists five things to look at if you think God is calling into church leadership:

While I believe God can and does often speak his calling into our lives in precise and unique ways, I believe that there should be some practical confirmation of that calling. After spending twenty years talking to younger leaders just getting started, I’ve developed a sense for those who are serious and those who aren’t – those who will go far because they lean into God’s grace and launch out in faith, and those who squander their time and energy on the sidelines.

When someone expresses an interest in ministry or talks of a calling, there are several questions that are quite appropriate to be asked, and through which a prospective leader can and should be screened, and I would divide them into five areas.

Ron Edmondson explains why leaders often resort to micromanagement:

There are times to manage closely, such as when you’re protecting a vision, but for the most part it disrupts progress more than it promotes.

As I work in the ministry world, however, it seems very common for micromanagement to be present. It could be a pastor who wants to control everything or a church governance that controls the pastor. And, by observation, I’ve learned there are common excuses for micromanagement.

Rebekah Simon-Peter lists three leadership lessons from Jesus:

The world wants more of churches: more spirituality, more community, more engagement, more love, more think bigmiracles, more demonstration of the kingdom. Not less. Yet, most of us are serving shrinking, declining, even dying churches. If our leadership is to be effective, if we are about manifesting the kingdom here on earth, if we are to make a true difference in the lives of those we lead, and the communities we serve, we need to think big. Then, even bigger.

Of course, thinking big isn’t enough. We have to know what to do with the ideas. Jesus mastered 3 hidden leadership skills that we would do well to learn.

Leadership Roundup

Leading worship isn’t just about music. It’s also about leading people: the people on your team and the people in your congregation.

There are so many great articles on leadership being posted online, and I’m finding new ones every week. So that means it’s time for this week’s Leadership Roundup.

Below you’ll find some of the best leadership resources I came across this week. Save them to Instapaper or Pocket or Read It Later or your bookmarks, and check them out when you have some time this weekend. Be challenged and be encouraged. Be a better leader.

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Chris Creech explains why we need to be original and innovative in our leadership:

The inventors and innovators of the world are some pretty incredible people. Where would we be without the automobile, indoor plumbing, cell phones, and the other amazing inventions out there. I’m typing this on a Mac. Where would I be without a Mac? I don’t even want to think about it. All of these inventions came from an innovator. But then, we have to see the flip side of the coin. This is the copier. The copiers simply wait for an innovator to come up with an idea, then they use it. Leaders have to be innovators. They cannot, and I truly mean cannot, be copiers. They must be innovators. Let’s take a look at some of the differences.

Mike Ayers reveals the first thing that leaders need to realize about themselves:

Leaders might say of themselves, “I am a pastor” or “I am project manager.” These statements are understandable, yet they also reveal a basic mindset common in the western world: we are what we do.

But who we are must transcend the things we do in life.

Philip Nation teaches you seven ways to be an awful church leader:

I often teach and speak on the subject of Christian leadership. Sometimes it is helpful to state what you mean by declaring what you do not mean. Here is a short list of what is NOT Christian leadership.

Carey Nieuwhof lists seven signs that your best leadership days might be behind you:

No leader wants to peak.

And even fewer leaders wants to peak early. I suppose at some point we all peak. But, personally, I’m shooting for that to happen at age 85…or 90…

Peaking as a leader rarely happens overnight. It happens over a season or a few years.

But there are signs. Ironically, the leaders who peak are often the last to know it.

Leadership Roundup

Leading worship isn’t just about music. It’s also about leading people: the people on your team and the people in your congregation.

There are so many great articles on leadership being posted online, and I’m finding new ones every week. So that means it’s time for this week’s Leadership Roundup.

Below you’ll find some of the best leadership resources I came across this week. Save them to Instapaper or Pocket or Read It Later or your bookmarks, and check them out when you have some time this weekend. Be challenged and be encouraged. Be a better leader.

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Karl Vaters provides six reasons that it’s harder to run a church than it is to run a business:

It’s much easier to start or run a successful business than to plant or pastor a successful church.

And when I say ‘successful church’ I don’t mean a big, growing one. I mean a solid, healthy one – of any size.

If you pastor a church and it’s not collapsing in a heap beneath you, you’re doing a better job at a harder task than most of the successful business owners and managers that people want us to emulate.

So, why is pastoring harder than running a business? Here are 6 reasons…

Tony Morgan shares ten signs of church decline that leaders should be watch out for:

Unfortunately most church leadership teams operate the same way. They put off routine check ups and maintenance until it’s too late and decline starts to set in. What if there were early warning signs (flashing lights on the dashboard) that helped indicate that trouble was ahead? In my experience coaching church leaders and consulting with churches across the country I’ve seen the following 10 indicators of an impending decline over and over again.

For those seeking a church leadership position, Rich Birch lists twenty-three interview questions you might encounter:

A well-planned interview for a new leader at your church is a critical part of the hiring process. Rather than “winging it” or asking the “same old, same old” questions, take time to plan the interview. It’s important to get a clear picture of the candidate in these three areas: Competency… Character… Chemistry… Below are some example questions in three different categories to help you plan for upcoming interviews.

Charles Stone lists four essentials for leading during troubled times:

If you are a leader, you will face turbulence in your ministry or organization. Sometimes the turbulence feels so intense that leading seems impossible. If you’re currently facing turbulent times in your role, consider what one of the most revered men in history did when he faced such times…

Leadership Roundup

Leading worship isn’t just about music. It’s also about leading people: the people on your team and the people in your congregation.

There are so many great articles on leadership being posted online, and I’m finding new ones every week. So that means it’s time for this week’s Leadership Roundup.

Below you’ll find some of the best leadership resources I came across this week. Save them to Instapaper or Pocket or Read It Later or your bookmarks, and check them out when you have some time this weekend. Be challenged and be encouraged. Be a better leader.

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Brandon Kelley lists twenty apps for church leaders:

In a world full of smart phones, tablets, laptops, and desktops, we have the opportunity to utilize many tools for the glory of God. There are so many great tools and apps for pastors that it may seem a little overwhelming, but I hope to break them down in some helpful categories and give you some thoughts on each one.

Jonathan Pearson reminds us why a leader’s personal life is so important:

While it’s okay to act a little different depending on who you’re around, it’s not okay to change who you are, to change your motives or your morals.

Proverbs has something to say about that…

Tim Elmore shares an effective end-of-year ritual for church leaders:

For thirty years now, I have performed a ritual at the end of December. It’s the way I wrap up each year and gain some perspective on my life. I blogged about this last December and got such good response, I thought it may be helpful again.

I take a half a day and get completely alone. Usually, I get away from the house and find a quiet place to reflect. During this time, I think, I pray and I review the past year, making notes of my evaluations along the way. I perform this ritual by asking myself the following questions…

Joseph Lalonde lists five things that church leaders overemphasize:

Leading a church is difficult. There’s pressure from many sources.

You may see agendas pushed by the church denomination, other leaders within the church, church members, and many other sources.

There’s always something someone wants you to be doing and this causes a conflict of direction within the church. Because of this, we see church leaders making mistakes in areas that are deadly to a church…