Weekend Links

Worship leaders, pastors, and everyone serving this weekend: know that I’m praying for you! I pray that God will bless you and stretch you and use you to grow His kingdom and expand His family.

As usual, I found lots of great links this week that I wanted to share with you but that didn’t quite fit into a post. When you get a few minutes this weekend, check them out and be encouraged and challenged. Maybe even learn something. 🙂

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Luke McElroy explains why Broadway producers have an easier job than people who plan church services:

A group of highly creative and technical people invest a few years putting together a single three-hour program that repeats every single day (sometimes multiple times a day) for years. Take the show Cats, for example. Composer Andrew Lloyd Webber began writing Cats in 1977. It first premiered on Broadway in 1981, after four years of planning, and it ran on Broadway for 18 years. During its lifetime, the total number of performances on Broadway nearly hit 7,500 shows before its final farewell… You and I get five days…

When I encourage you to support your pastor, this isn’t what I mean (I hope this isn’t real):

A pastor in Tanzania reportedly preaches while standing on top of his church members because his feet must not touch the ground during sermon…

Erik Raymond explains why you don’t need to apologize for being an ordinary church:

Let’s think together about church, and in particular the church where you are a member. If it is like most churches today it is not very large (probably less than 200 people). You may be tempted to think that your church in its modest size is rather insignificant. When I talk to people about their churches I almost sense a little embarrassment about the size and perceived scope of their church. Apologetic words like small and ordinary come out. I would argue that these words are not bad at all—and perhaps even quite accurate—but it is the sentiment behind them that is concerning, especially in light of what the church is and does.

Mike at FaithEngineer has an interesting breakdown of how much church software can cost:

Almost every week, I receive an announcement about a new service or software offering for churches. It’s exciting, because we now have so many resources to choose from. As churches, we now have the ability to provide tools for our congregations that take full advantage of the internet. Companies are providing online Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) solutions that help churches track, train, and communicate with their attenders. I think it is great, but I also see a problem developing for small and mid-size churches. With each new service and category of software, we see the overall cost increase to a point that is beyond our reach.

Chuck Lawless lists ten things your pastor is probably thinking while he’s preaching (and you might be thinking while you’re leading worship):

I’ve preached most Sundays since April of 1981. You’d assume by now that I could simply focus on nothing but the Word when I’m preaching, but I still think about other things at the same time. Here are some of those things that I – and, I suspect, many other pastors – think about…

Weekend Links

Worship leaders, pastors, and everyone serving this weekend: know that I’m praying for you! I pray that God will bless you and stretch you and use you to grow His kingdom and expand His family.

As usual, I found lots of great links this week that I wanted to share with you but that didn’t quite fit into a post. When you get a few minutes this weekend, check them out and be encouraged and challenged. Maybe even learn something. 🙂

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

David Prince questions why some churches that put a high value on great preaching often neglect other aspects of worship:

Where preaching is weak, anemic, unfaithful, and compromised in a church, everything else in congregational life, no matter how well done, is merely impotent ecclesial smoke and mirrors. That is where I stand. Period. But this post is designed to confront a different problem among those who agree with me on the primacy of preaching. Why is it that so many churches that profess a commitment to the primacy of expository preaching, settle for mediocrity in so many other facets of the church’s ministry? In my experience, it is not uncommon in churches with a high view of preaching, and who are fundamentally committed to the sovereignty of God, to put little effort into the other aspects of ministry, which are derivative of our commitment to the Word. It seems to me that it should be exactly the opposite. A high view of preaching and a high view of God should lead us to a pervasive commitment to excellence in all things in the life of the church.

Vince Wilcox explains why the worship wars are really a first world problem when you think about it:

These kinds of “worship wars” are definitely “First World” problems.

The vast majority of believers on our planet do not have these kinds of debates. They lift their voices in their own tongues accompanied by whatever instruments they have to sing songs with melodies that most of us could never follow composed by writers who will never be compensated by CCLI.

I get why people like what they like: it’s because it speaks to them and they feel that it will speak to those around them as profoundly.

And yet…

Len Wilson shares a great checklist to help you plan memorable, engaging worship:

Use this list of seven items as an itinerary for your next worship meeting. It’ll help save you so much time… Perhaps the biggest challenge to overcome in creative arts ministry is the loss of a singular narrative experience in most modern worship.

From Bible apps to church management software, Kent Shaffer’s list of tech tools for ministry is pretty comprehensive:

We aren’t out to answer these questions or rank who’s the best. But we have curated a list of what we believe to be the most notable and a few novel uses of technology in Christian ministry. Please use this list not to compete but to be inspired by how technology can be used for the good of God’s Kingdom.

Carey Nieuwhof lists five funny truths about church life, and the first item is painfully true for worship leaders:

Weird and the quirky things don’t help us advance the mission either. Some of them are things we do…some of them are things we encounter as leaders.

Hopefully by being able to recognize them and even—are you ready?—smile at them, we can move through them and make some progress.

Weekend Links

Worship leaders, pastors, and everyone serving this weekend: know that I’m praying for you! I pray that God will bless you and stretch you and use you to grow His kingdom and expand His family.

As usual, I found lots of great links this week that I wanted to share with you but that didn’t quite fit into a post. When you get a few minutes this weekend, check them out and be encouraged and challenged. Maybe even learn something. 🙂

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Jed Smith shares some good reasons to try things outside your comfort zone, especially for worship leaders:

Whether we are musicians or worship leaders, there are a lot of things that can stretch us out of our comfort zones… Venturing beyond the borders of our comfort zone is uncomfortable; in some cases, it even hurts. But it’s still important that we don’t stay confined to our bubbles. Here are some reasons why…

I loved Pam Argot’s story reminding us that spiritual opportunities are everywhere:

A couple of months ago, I started to have some pains in weird places in my body so I went to the doctor. He did not know what was wrong and sent me home. A couple of weeks went by and the pains got worst and they moved to my back so I went back to the doctor. At that time he sent me to physical therapy to find out what was the problem… she asked me when the pain was at its worst. I told her when we are at church. If I am not at church I can stand up and walk the pain off. She asked me why I just didn’t stop going to church?

I’m curious what you all think about the proposed design of this church:

New York City–based Urban Office Architecture has created a proposal for the Church of the Holy Spirit in Englewood, New Jersey, that looks more like a hip office building than a house of worship.

For those that think modern worship gets too loud, check this out:

Of the many macabre ways in which the MetanĂłia chapel differs from its counterparts around the world, perhaps the most revealing is its noticeboard.

As well as the usual updates on services, baptisms and weddings, it includes a host of blood-curdling advertisements for upcoming events.

“Night of the Massacre”, “Into the Infernal” and “Blood Fest” scream the headlines that might, at first sight, leave a visitor to a Catholic chapel alarmed or, at least, perplexed…

In fact, they are gig notices that testify to a small but growing heavy metal evangelical movement that is upturning Brazilian stereotypes of Catholicism, samba and favela violence.

Weekend Links

Worship leaders, pastors, and everyone serving this weekend: know that I’m praying for you! I pray that God will bless you and stretch you and use you to grow His kingdom and expand His family.

As usual, I found lots of great links this week that I wanted to share with you but that didn’t quite fit into a post. When you get a few minutes this weekend, check them out and be encouraged and challenged. Maybe even learn something. 🙂

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Heather Goodman on the intersection between emotionality and spirituality and how that affects our worship:

Just like God’s words never pass away, our hearts are the papyrus where not just words, but every interaction which we have truly experienced between Him and us in a place of intimacy are written. And once they are written on us in that way, they are permanent. You cannot rid yourself of things that are written in your heart by God – those places of intersection are forever renewed and changed and made One with Him. And much of that is touched emotionally.

So now, let’s talk about music, and worship.

Eric Drew shares the good and the bad about that big church down the street:

You know the one I’m talking about. It’s in your town, or close enough. They have the fancy lights, loud music, and they’re stealing our young families. That’s right, I visited THAT big church recently. Here’s what I saw…

Dwayne Moore on the similarities between worship ministry and football:

Besides the fact that I’m a huge football fan (Roll Tide!), there’s another, more significant reason why I like to use football as an analogy: Football is not only familiar to most people in our area of the country; it also runs a convenient parallel to how we try to organize and conduct our ministry at Valley View.

We’re Like Special Teams

That’s not to say we think we’re special, mind you. Actually, it’s quite the opposite…

In an article by Lisa Cannon Green, LifeWay Research asked over seven hundred former pastors why they left the ministry:

No sabbatical. No help with counseling. No clear picture of what’s expected.

Hundreds of former senior pastors say these were the crucial elements missing from the final churches they led before quitting the pastorate.

A recent study by LifeWay Research points to ways churches can encourage pastors to stay in the ministry, said Ed Stetzer, Executive Director of the Nashville-based research organization…

Robby McAlpine on secular bands, Abraham’s nephew, and being salt and light:

Is this a side of Lot that we should actually be encouraged by? In context, Peter’s focus is on God’s ability to save His people. So, we need to be careful not to build a theology out of Peter’s description of Lot, and miss the point of the passage… And I get this, I really do. I play in an assortment of bands, in a wide variety of venues (pubs, concert halls, outdoor festivals, etc.). There have been — and will be again — times when the spiritually negative vibe really wears you down. And you get tired of it and just wish you could play 24/7 in a worship band.

Weekend Links

Worship leaders, pastors, and everyone serving this weekend: know that I’m praying for you! I pray that God will bless you and stretch you and use you to grow His kingdom and expand His family.

As usual, I found lots of great links this week that I wanted to share with you but that didn’t quite fit into a post. When you get a few minutes this weekend, check them out and be encouraged and challenged. Maybe even learn something. 🙂

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Matt Brady lists two crucial skills for every worship leader:

As a worship leader, it can be easy to get caught up in the long and short of the details of worship music, song selection, ministry trends, church technology, and everything else.

I am as guilty as anyone else in letting all of the different details get in the way of focusing on the main task at hand when it comes to a Sunday morning or Wednesday night.

If we break it down to its most basic elements, the worship leader MUST be capable and willing to do two things.

Seth Putnam shares some thoughts on how much to invest in self-improvement versus helping your team improve:

How much attention do you spend on improving yourself as opposed to improving others? At one point, I’ve calculated that I’ve focused my time serving, equipping, and encouraging others about 80% of my week, while only averaging 20% on bettering myself. Sounds humble & godly but not very wise in the long run. I’ve become so wrapped up in the building of others that I’ve forgotten step one to longevity – keep myself built up…

Andy from Musicademy has some helpful advice on congregational singing range:

I can’t help but notice how many worship song album versions aren’t very suitable for small churches. So many songs are either too rangy for small congregations with octave leaps that leave either the men or the women stranded. Or when original album keys are too high I’ve heard so many worship leaders change a song into a key that works for their own voice but is still equally unsingable for the majority of the congregation. So here are some tips that may help make those anthemic songs a little more singable.

Brad Bridges explains some of the recent and current shifts in American church denominations:

Have you noticed some of the recent changes within denominations in the United States? It is fascinating to step back and observe the seismic shifts sweeping through many different circles. These trends aren’t bound to any one denomination or church group, but have been increasingly occurring year after year. As the culture changes and church leaders alter their methodology, these shifting denominational trends in the American church will likely continue to shift or pivot down the road.

While all this is occurring, I also notice a high degree of discomfort among church leaders as they wrestle with a few of these trends. Why is that?

Travis Brown’s advice on how to reach Millennials will probably reach more than just Millennials:

Many churches are struggling to appeal to Millennials. Generally speaking, Millennials are those who are born between the early 1980s and the early 2000s. As a Millennial, I have witnessed the church’s efforts to attract me, keep me engaged, and stay relevant to my generation. It is my goal here to speak to this struggle firsthand from my research and personal experiences.

Weekend Links

Worship leaders, pastors, and everyone serving this weekend: know that I’m praying for you! I pray that God will bless you and stretch you and use you to grow His kingdom and expand His family.

As usual, I found lots of great links this week that I wanted to share with you but that didn’t quite fit into a post. When you get a few minutes this weekend, check them out and be encouraged and challenged. Maybe even learn something. 🙂

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Scott Cochrane shares five principles to help you read through the Bible in a year:

I’ve just completed my 17th year in a row reading through the Bible cover to cover. This practice is one that fills my spiritual tank and which provides the fuel that drives my leadership.

But like many others, I found it to be a very challenging discipline at first… The key, I discovered, was to assemble a plan that was built on five important principles…

Austin Fischer takes a look at the music of U2 and whether faith helps or hinders art:

Last year, The New Yorker featured an interesting piece on U2 called “The Church of U2.” It came on the heels of their new album (Songs of Innocence) and is a must read for any fan. It examines U2’s deep but conflicted relationship with Christian faith, suggesting it’s the prime source of their artistic genius.

The article gets particularly interesting toward the end as the writer begins to not so subtly make the case that the quality of U2’s music began to dip when the band matured in their faith…

Benjamin Vrbicek explains why even your food allergies can be used to glorify God:

But now I have a food allergy. Now, I’m the guy at Panera who asks to see an ingredient list when he orders. I had to do this the other day and it caused a scene. The kind woman taking orders couldn’t find the book with all the info, and then she couldn’t find the manager, and then the manager was busy, and when he finally came to the rescue, he wasn’t sure where the book was either… This is a post to offer three ways to eat and drink to the glory of God or rather, because of food allergies, not eat and drink to the glory of God.

Chris Breslin examines the love/hate relationship that many of us have with Christian radio:

Dear Christian Radio,

I don’t listen to you often, but when I do I must admit I don’t always not like what I hear. I mean there are times when I’m looking to just fill my aural space with the safety and ease of knowing what I’m going to get. I dial when I’m looking for what, by your own admission, you are offering: something positive, something encouraging. And even though I’m apt to criticize you for your unspoken “Jesus quota” in your songs, perhaps that’s exactly what I’m looking for when I hit that last preset to the right, tired of quarrelsome talk radio, exhausted by sports hot takes, burdened and overwhelmed by the BBC World Report’s most recent litany of disturbing world news.

This makes it all the more distressing to me that most recently I tuned in to hear…

Nick Morrow shares a songwriting project that I’ll be following closely:

Fifty songs in one year. That’s the goal.

Let me explain.

Until recently, my Venn Diagram of “Jesus & Music” never overlapped much. I grew up in a house that didn’t allow any non-Christian music, and in my creative rebellion I swore off “Christian” music forever…

So I came up with this idea. What if I tried to write a song every week? Like, not just a melody or a few lines, but a full song.

Weekend Links

Worship leaders, pastors, and everyone serving this weekend: know that I’m praying for you! I pray that God will bless you and stretch you and use you to grow His kingdom and expand His family.

As usual, I found lots of great links this week that I wanted to share with you but that didn’t quite fit into a post. When you get a few minutes this weekend, check them out and be encouraged and challenged. Maybe even learn something. 🙂

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Barnabas Piper provides a bullet point list of what’s wrong with seventeen of our favorite Christmas songs:

Mary did know. The angel told her. Read your bible.

The night was not silent. A baby was being born in a barn for goodness sake.

The little Lord Jesus did make crying. He was a healthy human baby after all.

If someone wishes you a merry Christmas but won’t leave until they get figgy pudding…

Turns out that, according to Jonathan Merritt, most of our nativity scenes have serious issues:

There’s a rubber-duck nativity for those want yuletide during their bath time, and even an Irish nativity with three wise men bearing gifts of clover, Guinness, and a pot of gold. The 2003 Christmas film Love Actually famously featured a grade-school nativity play with multiple lobsters, Spider-Man, and a large green octopus—as if pointing out the myriad strange ways the nativity can been reimagined.

And yet these nativity scenes aren’t much more far-fetched than the traditional ones…

Dave Gipson explains why “peace on earth” doesn’t mean every Christmas will be easy:

Oh, and “peace on earth, good will toward men”. Sounds ironic, doesn’t it?

That famous tagline of Christmas, copyrighted by God 2000 years ago, seems simply bursting with irony this December of 2015. Do we know of any time when the threat to world peace was so great? The conflict we face will not likely be over anytime soon, and will not stay conveniently on some foreign shore. It is even now at our doorsteps.

So how do we celebrate the “Prince of Peace” when peace is in such small supply? As war wages around us, is talk of God’s peace just a sick joke?

No. The first Christmas indeed brought peace, but not to the world…

Simon Hawkins shares ten worship songwriting tips:

Fresh from a stint at the Write About Jesus (WAJ) songwriters’ conference in St Louis, Missouri, Simon Hawkins reveals his top-10 worship writing tips to check when you’re next rewriting…

Marshall Segal shares a timely and seasonal comparison between two well known green characters – Yoda and the Grinch:

Along with the rest of you, still filled with the galactic wonder and nostalgia of a child born in the eighties, I’m excited to see J.J. Abrams’s latest installment. But I haven’t yet. Therefore, in the words of Master Yoda, “Not if anything to say about it I have.”

Instead, inspired by the proximity to Christmas, I’m putting a light saber into the hands of the greedy Grinch and pitting him against the Star Wars hero of blockbuster past. In the end, the two may only have a green complexion in common, but comparing them really can be an exercise in treasuring the coming of Christ, and in living and serving more like him.

Weekend Links

Worship leaders, pastors, and everyone serving this weekend: know that I’m praying for you! I pray that God will bless you and stretch you and use you to grow His kingdom and expand His family.

As usual, I found lots of great links this week that I wanted to share with you but that didn’t quite fit into a post. When you get a few minutes this weekend, check them out and be encouraged and challenged. Maybe even learn something. 🙂

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Tyler Huckabee reflects on the melancholy undertones of Christmas – and some of our favorite Christmas songs:

[Vince] Guaraldi wrote “Christmastime Is Here” at the behest of Lee Mendelson, who co-produced A Charlie Brown Christmas along with Peanuts creator Charles Schultz. The song was intended as an instrumental piece, but the network demanded lyrics—lyrics which Mendelson absent-mindedly scribbled out on the back of an envelope. They’re awful: “Christmastime is here. Happiness and cheer. Fun for all that children call their favorite time of year.”

That insipid frivolity stands in stark contrast to the melody itself, which is much truer to the glum mood of Schultz’s comic…

Some celebrations do all the heavy lifting for you. Christmas requires some work on your part. It’s a melancholy time of year. Celebration will have to be crafted from whatever tools are at hand. That’s why it’s called “making merry.”

Have some Christmas cheer through these free songs by Kate Thomas (but donate if you can):

Wishing you and yours a very merry Christmas.

This Christmas EP is available for free download, or purchase at any amount you choose.

Merry Christmas!

Steve Mathewson lists six ways to make sure your Christmas sermon is accurate and Bible-centered:

After preaching the birth narratives in Matthew and Luke for so many years, pastors may be so hungry for fresh insights that they embrace novel interpretations that obscure the story as badly as the old misunderstandings…

Given these concerns, let me offer six mistakes to avoid when preaching the story of Jesus’s birth. My concern is to help you proclaim, in the power of the Spirit, the birth narratives in a way that raises your listeners’ love and affection (and yours) for our Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ.

Here’s a cool new take on “Angels From The Realms Of Glory” by the band Lion Of Judah:

We’re a new Christian band seeking to use our gifts to to write music which comforts, encourages, and inspires our brothers and sisters in Christ.

This is the first single we’re going to release and it’s FREE/Pay what you want!

Jason Soroski shares a little detail from A Charlie Brown Christmas that’s easy to miss, but really cool:

I was in the first grade back when they still performed Christmas pageants in schools (less than 50 years, but still a very long time ago), and our class performed a version of the Charlie Brown Christmas. Since I was kind of a bookworm and already had a blue blanket, I was chosen to play the part of Linus. As Linus, I memorized Luke 2:8-14, and that Scripture has been hidden in my heart ever since.

But while working so diligently to learn those lines, there is one important thing I didn’t notice then, and didn’t notice until now.

Weekend Links

Worship leaders, pastors, and everyone serving this weekend: know that I’m praying for you! I pray that God will bless you and stretch you and use you to grow His kingdom and expand His family.

As usual, I found lots of great links this week that I wanted to share with you but that didn’t quite fit into a post. When you get a few minutes this weekend, check them out and be encouraged and challenged. Maybe even learn something. 🙂

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Len Wilson shares about using featured stories in worship to call people to action:

As Creative Director at a large church, I like to tell stories that invite people from the corporate gathering of worship to a next step on the journey of faith. One way to do this is to encourage people to take action…

Stories of such action, an applied faith if you will, can be told through a Featured Story of the Week. When done well, a Featured Story embodies a worship theme’s concept and gives people a picture of what it looks like when faith is put into action.

Aaron Armstrong reminds us why it’s okay to listen to and enjoy some secular art:

But I’ve got to be honest: Christian art really bums me out. It’s not that there aren’t amazing musicians, writers, artists and filmmakers who are Christians—some of whom are even creating brilliant content that explicitly reflects their faith. It’s just that a lot of it seems to be trying too hard to be like whatever is popular in the mainstream but a bit more “Jesus-y”. This, incidentally, is why you see the signs in the music section of the Christian bookstore that say, “Looking for something like Foo Fighters? Try this!” (Whether said comparison is accurate is another story altogether.)

NOTE: do not use this chart as a guide to congregational vocal ranges:

Compare the vocal ranges of today’s top artists with the greatest of all time. This chart shows the highest and lowest notes each artist hit in the recording studio. Hover over the bars to see the songs on which they reached those notes.

Paul Wilksinson unveils what might be the first time somebody had to search for the lyrics to a worship song:

How does a young girl — some commentaries suggest maybe 14 years old — come out with such a deep, theological response to the angel’s announcement that she will birth the Messiah all of Israel has waited for?

Mary’s burst of praise contains over a dozen references to Old Testament (I prefer “First Testament”) scriptures, which she no doubt learned as part of the religious education all Jewish children received, right?

But the next question would be, Where did Luke get the text of her song?

This is either the weirdest tech commercial ever or the weirdest holiday singalong ever:

Weekend Links

Worship leaders, pastors, and everyone serving this weekend: know that I’m praying for you! I pray that God will bless you and stretch you and use you to grow His kingdom and expand His family.

As usual, I found lots of great links this week that I wanted to share with you but that didn’t quite fit into a post. When you get a few minutes this weekend, check them out and be encouraged and challenged. Maybe even learn something. 🙂

Remember, these are just excerpts, but I strongly encourage you to click through and read each post in its entirety.

Jonathan Pokluda sheds some on light on the seldom-practiced act of fasting:

Fasting is the act of giving up something—food, in almost all cases—for a set period of time, in order to draw closer to God.

At least, that’s the Christian perspective. Any time you choose to go without food, for any reason, could be defined as a “fast.” (Even sleeping; that’s why “breakfast” is when you “break the fast” of the previous night.) But it’s not fasting the way the Bible talks about it unless the purpose is to focus on or improve your relationship with God.

Craig Borlase shares some advice from C.S. Lewis on being a better writer (and by extension, a better songwriter):

Having written for academics, children, theologians and seemingly everyone else in between, it’s clear that CS Lewis knew a thing or two about choosing the right words.

Which makes us think that his 1956 letter back to a child who asked him for advice on becoming a better writer might still be of use to songwriters today.

Mikael Wood wrote about a recent pop concert that kind of turned into a church service:

Was it a pop concert? A movie premiere? A skateboarding demonstration? “An Evening With Justin Bieber” embodied aspects of all three. But what the vaguely billed event at Staples Center felt most like was a church service.

Jonathan Malm lists a few CCM classics that broke the CCM mold:

Let’s be honest: Most of Contemporary Christian Music (CCM) back in the day was just songs that copied secular songs and added a Christian theme to it. I’m not saying there wasn’t artistry or validity in the music. But the Christian market mostly wanted Christian alternatives to the music they really wanted to listen to, so that’s what CCM produced.

Every now and then, though, a song would come along and blow my mind. There would be a song or an emerging band that had their own sound and actually changed the music scene for everyone. It wasn’t often, but here are a few songs that did just that in my opinion.

Our regular readers know how much we love seeing new music for the church being crowdfunded, so we’re excited to pass along this link to “A Beautiful Liturgy” by Rich Kirkpatrick and his daughter Emilie:

At age 13, my daughter Emilie Kirkpatrick began leading worship with me. In the past eight years, she has released two projects of her own songs and is a in skillful worship leading as well as songwriting. These eight year have formed a collaboration. Recently, we formed “a beautiful liturgy” as a music group to write and lead worship! We have already recorded one of the five songs for our 5-song project! But, we need your help and support as independent musicians.